Skip to content Skip to footer
Things You Can Do Right Now

JOIN OUR CALL TO END FGM/C IN ALL SOMALI REGIONS

Female genital mutilation (FGM) remains a prevalent issue in many Somali communities worldwide, affecting a significant number of girls and women. Over 99% of Somali Women have undergone female circumcision in Somalia. The most common type is pharaonic, devastatingly affecting their health and well-being. Despite efforts to combat the practice, FGM persists in many regions of the Somali community, including Somalia, Somaliland, Djibouti, Kenya, Ethiopia, and elsewhere. In July 2020, the Human Rights Council adopted resolution 44/16 on eliminating FGM/C in Somalia to speed up efforts to reach zero tolerance for FGM by 2030 and to restate the global ban on the harmful practice as it constitutes a serious violation of women’s rights

save the date

march, 2024

Upcoming Events

Deprecated: Automatic conversion of false to array is deprecated in /customers/2/8/2/beltofsomaliwomen.com/httpd.www/wp-content/plugins/trx_addons/includes/plugin.lists.php on line 385

Why It Is Important

“FGM is a tradition that has been passed down from generation to generation in Somalia, but it is a tradition that must be broken. We must work together to end this harmful practice and ensure that all girls have the opportunity to grow up healthy and free from harm.” – Fatuma Ibrahim, activist and founder of the Somali Women’s Development Centre.

“GBV is a social justice issue that requires collective action. We need to work together to challenge gender stereotypes and promote a culture of respect and equality.” – Nasra Ismail, activist, and founder of the Somali Women Development Centre.

“FGM is not a tradition, it is a violation of human rights. We need to educate our communities about the dangers of FGM and empower women and girls to say no to this harmful practice.” – Edna Adan Ismail, founder of the Edna Adan University Hospital in Somaliland

“GBV is a public health issue that affects not only individuals but also families and communities. We need to prioritize prevention efforts and provide accessible and responsive services for survivors of violence.” – Sadiyo Siad, founder of the Somali Family Services organization.

Gender-based violence affects women and girls in all societies, and we must take action to prevent and respond to it. We need to empower women and girls to speak out against violence and support survivors.

Hawa Aden, founder of the Galkayo Education Center for Peace and Development in Ethiopia

Violence against women is a serious problem in our community. We need to break the silence and speak out against it so that we can find solutions to end it

Fatima Mohamed, member of a women's organization in Ethiopia.

FGM is a harmful practice that has no basis in the Quran or the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him). We must speak out against it and work to end it.

Sheikh Dr. Ali Gomaa, Former Grand Mufti of Egypt

FGM is a form of violence against women and it has no place in our society. We must raise awareness and work together to end this harmful practice.

Hawa Abdi, a Somali woman and advocate against FGM in Djibouti.

FGM is a human rights issue that requires a concerted effort from religious leaders of all faiths to bring about change. We must work together to protect the rights of girls and women

Sheikh Ibrahim Lethome, Kenyan Muslim scholar and activist.

Protecting girls and women against FGM is a moral duty. We must work towards providing the best support and help to those who have undergone this gruesome practice.

Zahra Naleie.

FGM is not part of our religion, but it has become a cultural tradition that harms our girls. We must reject this practice and protect our daughters from its harms.

Fadumo Ahmed, a Somali mother in Djibouti.

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is an abhorrent and outdated practice that has no place in any religion, including Islam.

Imam Sayed Hassan Al-Qazwini, American Muslim leader and author.

“FGM is a form of violence against women and girls, and it has no place in our world

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women

FGM is a harmful practice that has no place in Somali culture. We must work together to end it

Fatima Jibrell, Somali environmentalist and women's rights activist.

FGM is a deeply ingrained cultural practice, but we must confront it and work to eliminate it.

Safia Aidid, Somali-American politician and women's rights activist

FGM is a complex issue that requires a multifaceted approach. We need to engage with communities, religious leaders, health professionals, and policymakers to bring an end to this harmful practice

Hawa Abdi, Somali human rights activist and physician.

FGM is a cruel and painful practice that has no basis in Islam or Somali tradition. We must speak out against it.

Ahmed Hussen, Somali-Canadian politician and former Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship.

PRESENCE OF FGM IN THE WORLD

About

The Belt of Somali Women is a Somali women-led platform advocating and lobbying to take Action Against Violence Against Women and focusing on female genital mutilation (FGM).

Deprecated: Automatic conversion of false to array is deprecated in /customers/2/8/2/beltofsomaliwomen.com/httpd.www/wp-content/plugins/trx_addons/includes/plugin.lists.php on line 385
Contacts
Deprecated: Automatic conversion of false to array is deprecated in /customers/2/8/2/beltofsomaliwomen.com/httpd.www/wp-content/plugins/trx_addons/includes/plugin.lists.php on line 385
Belt of Somali Women © 2024. All Rights Reserved.